Talkback: Weekend Mountain Weather Outlook

11 messages
23/09/2011 at 11:35
So, which specialist mountain weather forecasts do you rate? I used to be really fond of the MWIS one, but the combined Peak/Dales forecast seems to have made it quite erratic and I no quite believe anything it says, so I tend to put more trust in the Met Office mountain forecast.

Is there anything we've missed though?

OutdoorsMagic Editor | jon@outdoorsmagic.com 

23/09/2011 at 11:52
A combination of Met Office/MWIS for short term and keeping abreast of future trends on Netweather.
23/09/2011 at 11:52
I just tried to reply to this but got the Blue Screen of Death
23/09/2011 at 11:57
OM appears to be limiting me to very short posts atm. I suspect this was something that was aimed at LiL rather than myself, but any suggestions as to how I can post something slightly longer?
Edited: 23/09/2011 at 11:58
23/09/2011 at 13:16

I also set less store by mwis these days - it often seems overly-pessimistic for Snowdonia, and it only covers daytimes which is less use if you want to stay out overnight.

I'm turning more and more to yr.no

It's perhaps not specifically a mountain forecast but it's what I've used for years on my winter trips to Norwegian mountains (the staffed huts tend to publish it each day), and if it's good enough for that then I'll trust it as much as any other forecast for other locations. It seems pretty good for my local daily "shall I cycle commute today" forcast, and for locations around north Wales, and was pretty accurate for Nepal in April.

23/09/2011 at 15:40

I'm going to attempt to post the comment I made earlier that's been met with the Blue Screen of Death all day...

Met Office Mountain Area forecast is the only specialist mountain forecast for the Brecon Beacons so I'm more or less stuck with that. There isn't any longer a separate Welsh Mountain Forecast supplied by the Met Office as far as I'm aware, but one of the most useful things about the Met Office forecast is that it includes a Recent Rainfall tab, useful for thinking about river crossings and whether the ground will be extremely boggy or just boggy.

The Met Office used to have under its Invent section a really good rainfall radar which included predicted rainfall, and I found it to be pretty accurate, and very helpful particularly for deciding when and where to climb outside, given the various micro-climates round here. That appears to have been dumbed down now into something less useful, but if anyone knows where it's gone, or can direct me to something similar, I'd be grateful.

I'll have a look at Accuweather sometimes, especially when I'm in Ireland.

edited to add: thank * for that, it's finally posted

Edited: 23/09/2011 at 15:40
23/09/2011 at 15:47
Blimey, I don't know what's going on with that. We had a bug that stopped people posting talkback at all last week, but that should be fixed now. Have you done something to upset the site

OutdoorsMagic Editor | jon@outdoorsmagic.com 

23/09/2011 at 15:49
Oh, very probably... but if not, I can swiftly rectify that
24/09/2011 at 10:19

+1 for yr.no.

I seldom look at the forecast, more so in winter though. I usually look at BBC/MWIS?yr.no and then take a SWAG.

24/09/2011 at 19:42
Matt C wrote (see)

I also set less store by mwis these days - it often seems overly-pessimistic for Snowdonia, and it only covers daytimes which is less use if you want to stay out overnight.

I'm turning more and more to yr.no

It's perhaps not specifically a mountain forecast but it's what I've used for years on my winter trips to Norwegian mountains (the staffed huts tend to publish it each day), and if it's good enough for that then I'll trust it as much as any other forecast for other locations. It seems pretty good for my local daily "shall I cycle commute today" forcast, and for locations around north Wales, and was pretty accurate for Nepal in April.

Nice one Matt, not come acrosss that one before, looks good.
24/09/2011 at 20:30

Is accuweather no good?


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