Gas canister stove for simmering

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21/04/2012 at 20:03

Hi guys,

I have a Jetboil Sol Ti and to be honest i'm extremely disappointed with it, so i'm looking for another solution.

I'm after a gas cannister stove that will allow me to easily simmer to cook pasta, beans etc, i have no real budget but i will be using it for backpacking so it does need to be fairly light.

Any ideas please?

Cheers

Mark

21/04/2012 at 20:12
The Jetboil is really best at heating water quickly and with minimal use of gas. It's probably the worst gas stove around for simmering. Virtually any other gas burner on the market will allow you to simmer stuff. Like the MSR Pocket Rocket -- or the copy of it by a company called Gelert which costs about £10, I believe.
21/04/2012 at 20:35

Thanks guys.

Had problems cooking a tin of beans with the Sol Ti, even on the lowest setting and stiring constantly it melted the heat exchanger ring.

Looked as much as i can on-line but it's tough as it seems 1 persons simmer is anothers flame thrower.

I did short list the Crux stove, but i've read a few reports that it has poor simmering abilities.

GOF,

What about something like the OmniLite Ti, have you any experience with this stove on gas canisters?

21/04/2012 at 20:45
incidently I've been playing with my jetboil flash today in particually with it's the ability to simmer. I can't speak for the  Sol but it is possible to simmer with it if you practice. you need to very carefully turn the flame down, this can take some practice and you will often turn it off to begin with, I notice that the flame in this "simmer mode" on the flash often gets smaller, maybe the regulator on the sol will help with that?

to summerise, Keep looking for somthing that'll suit you but don't give up on the jetboil just yet.  I sometimes use it with a primus eta power pot and the heat exchanger gives a nice secure fit on the jetboil without needing to use the potstand. using the primus pot due is actually less efficient and takes longer to boil water in compared to the jetboil advantage for using it though is that it takes longer to boil water and is wider so it is actually possible to simmer without too much difficulty on a jetboil.
21/04/2012 at 21:10

The Jetboil does what it says on the tin "boils water" but my problem is that, it will not heat up even very moist food like Heinz beans without melting the heat exchanger on the lowest possible flame.

This

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d43/cbr6fs/IMG_1333.jpg

Did this

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d43/cbr6fs/IMAG0264.jpg

Again that was on a flame THAT low i had to relight it 3 times.

21/04/2012 at 21:20
I use Primus with pz ignition. It has done me proud for probably 5 years now and still lights first time, every time. A mid width burner that I've often used to summer.
I have a cheap remote can vango stove. No pre-heater but works well enough. A wide burner and easy to summer. 220 g and packs into its box nicely.
Some things better to use a cost than summer imho. Bring pot of pasta to book then pop into a cost to allow it to cool without using anymore has. No gd with tin of beans but does pasta and noodles well.
21/04/2012 at 22:37
Omnilite ti - £160 just so you can simmer some beans...?!

The Flyti stove sold under various company names simmers well. I used a remote stove with the same burner head throughout the winter and was very impressed with it. Using a pot cosy eliminates the need to simmer with food like rice, pasta etc and saves you fuel.
21/04/2012 at 22:55

I have just started to use the Primus Express.     It can simmer.    Coupled with a windshield it's all good.

Simmering was the main requirement when I started to look to gas,

Also have started to use Eddie Mechan (from TGO) idea of pour and store bags coupled with the bubble wrap tin foil, This is another form of simmering, it really does work

So before ditching the jetboil have a go with dehydrated food and a pot cosy

21/04/2012 at 23:32
Montgomery Wick wrote (see)
Omnilite ti - £160 just so you can simmer some beans...?! The Flyti stove sold under various company names simmers well. I used a remote stove with the same burner head throughout the winter and was very impressed with it. Using a pot cosy eliminates the need to simmer with food like rice, pasta etc and saves you fuel.

I don't mind paying for quality goods, £160 on a stove that's light and does everything i need is a bargain compared to the £100 odd i spent on my Jetboil that made 4 cups of tea then melted.

 I'll take a look at the FlyTi, thanks.

GOF wrote (see)

this one has a following.  this looks interesting too

My wide burner head cylinder top stove cost £7 some years ago.

just found this one73 grammes and under £21

 Great thanks, can you confirm that they all simmer please?

Edward wrote (see)

I have just started to use the Primus Express.     It can simmer.    Coupled with a windshield it's all good.

Simmering was the main requirement when I started to look to gas,

Also have started to use Eddie Mechan (from TGO) idea of pour and store bags coupled with the bubble wrap tin foil, This is another form of simmering, it really does work

So before ditching the jetboil have a go with dehydrated food and a pot cosy

Another one to add to the list, thanks.

The pot cosy system is great, the problem with the Sol Ti though is getting enough heat in it to warm the food through without melting the heat exchanger, and/or burning the food to the bottom of the pan/cup.

It's a pretty useless system in that it's a one race pony, it only boils water nothing else.

The instructions say to use a food with a high moisture content only, IMO beans are a pretty high moisture content food, yet Jetboil still refused to exchange the melted cup.

Their choice, but lesson learnt i'll not be recommending Jetboil again or purchasing any of their products, plus it means i'll be a lot more careful with my next stove purchase, that will have to be ability to simmer well.

Maybe i'll only simmer a tin of beans and sausages once a year, but i still want that option.

Plenty of stoves to look at so far though, thank you.

Please keep them coming.

Another quick question please.

For those that are recommending stoves they have been able to simmer with, what pans were/are you using please?

Cheers

Mark

21/04/2012 at 23:46

Gix

Why not only use dehydrated food, use the jetboil at it's best and only boil water, then add the boiling water to the dried food and let it reconstitute

I know this is not the answer to the your question, but have a think about your overall system before wasting the jetboil

I ended up using a 500mls trangia 27 kettle,   and I was looking at everything, the kettle even beat a very curvy evernew 900mls pan with lid

 ...sure isnt working on your system half the craic !

22/04/2012 at 00:15

Don't know if this would work with a JetBoil, a way of cooking I've used to cook Pasta and Rice.

 Heat water to boiling, add P/R and bring back to boil.

 Take off stove and let stand, if covered with a lid or the like, it should cook by it's self.

 If not, a 'wee' blast on stove to boiling should do the job.

 If adding to something and needs warmed, quick blast on cooker.


Always carry a flagon of whiskey in case of snake bite..... and furthermore always carry a small snake.   W.C.FIELDS.

Walk, climb, camp. Just get out there

 

22/04/2012 at 00:33

Edward,

I hate dehydrated food with a passion.

Sometimes it's a necessity due to space and weight constraints, if i can help it though i'll avoid it.

GOF,

Great advice thanks

huskyman,

As i say the problem with the Sol Ti is, unless it's 100% you simply can't get enough heat into the mug.

Even on the lowest burner setting it welds the beans to the mug even before you get a chance to stir it.

If i could heat my tin of beans up to a boil, i'd happily stick the mug in a cosy to cook the sausages through.

Problem is though i end up with cremated beans at the bottom of the mug and stone cold beans in the middle and at the top.

22/04/2012 at 00:36

When i used gas i never had trouble simmering with the pocket rocket, didn't like it as a general stove though so got rid.

If i simmer at all these days it's with a simmer ring on a home made meths burner. 


Include a little history in your walks. Pecsaetan - Ancient Derbyshire, Staffordshire and South Yorkshire - http://pecsaetan.weebly.com/

22/04/2012 at 01:51

Gix,

 sounds like what you need is a stove that can heat food slowly.

 that way you won't burn the like of beans to bottom of pot.

 the crux you mentioned will do so, (needs a windshield if cooking outside tent), others from Prmius, MSR, or Chinese "copys", will 'simmer' and will cook with out burning pot/food if used right.

 As for cooking tins of food, the best way I've seen/used is to:-

 boil water in pot, open tin slightly, put tin in the water and let heat.

 done that way food cooks in tin, no mess to clean in pot and have hot water to use for something else, cup of something, washing, for example.

 that's how I was shown in Cadets, many years ago when "rat packs" came mostly in tins.

 I use an Optimus Terra HE 1lt pot with lid, at the moment, cooking with either a crux or omni-mf stove, (omni can also simmer).


Always carry a flagon of whiskey in case of snake bite..... and furthermore always carry a small snake.   W.C.FIELDS.

Walk, climb, camp. Just get out there

 

Edited: 22/04/2012 at 02:04
22/04/2012 at 03:07
Btw, i avoid titanium pans, rubbish for anything other than boiling water in, if you want a pan to cook in go for an anodised ali pan, much better all round, though obviously a bit heavier.

Include a little history in your walks. Pecsaetan - Ancient Derbyshire, Staffordshire and South Yorkshire - http://pecsaetan.weebly.com/

22/04/2012 at 03:30
The stoves GOF lists are all made by Chinese companies and rebadged. The Vango stove, for example, is the Fire Maple FMS-116, the heavier cousin of the 116T (Flyti). And this one looks familiar too...

I liked my Fire Maple enough I'm going to buy a few of these and sell them on, keeping one for myself as a cannister-top replacement for warmer conditions.
Edited: 22/04/2012 at 03:32
22/04/2012 at 03:49
Scratch that - the new FMS-118 is out at last, a remote stove with preheating tube that weighs less than 150g and costs under £20...yes, please.
22/04/2012 at 04:05
S'all Chinese to me.

Include a little history in your walks. Pecsaetan - Ancient Derbyshire, Staffordshire and South Yorkshire - http://pecsaetan.weebly.com/

22/04/2012 at 09:37
FWIW, I've found that the simmering performance of Rocket clones is to some extent dependent on how windy it is - the stiffer the breeze, the more likely the flame will blow out on low. A windshield - even one improvised from cooking foil and stiff card - helps a lot.
22/04/2012 at 13:53

As mentioned a cosy is a good alternative to a simmer. 

 You could also try a diffuser plate between your pan & stove.    At it's simplest it could be a lid from a large tin of beans or somesuch with a few holes drilled it in & smoothed off.

example

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